Categories Magazines

Stella Telegraph Magazine

Winona was also cover of this weekend’s Stella magazine, part of the Sunday Telegraph. You can read the article below:

Girl Uninterrupted

Winona Ryder and I are sitting side by side in silence on a sofa in the bar of Chateau Marmont, holding our palms upturned and outstretched.

“You see,” she says with a smile. “It frees you up, doesn’t it? Everything sort of comes to the surface.”

The star of Heathers, Girl Interrupted and Black Swan – an actress who has been reductively if accurately described as “the poster girl for the 1990s” – has been telling me about “this weird thing I do if I have to get emotional in a film. It always works.” She doesn’t just want me to take her word for it; she wants me to try it. Which I do because this is Los Angeles and nobody would bat an eyelid if you were to assume the lotus pose in the middle of a bar and start chanting, “Om shanti, shanti.” But also, simply, because Ryder wants me do it.

Something about the actress draws you in from the outset, making you want to befriend and protect her – both uncomfortable sensations for an interviewer. She talks in open-ended sentences, dipping in and out of whispers and veering off on tangents. Continue reading Stella Telegraph Magazine

Categories Magazines

Red Magazine Scans

As announced, Winona is covering Red magazine, and the issue is already available on your local newstands and/or for digital purchase. I got my own copy and now you can find digital scans added to the gallery:

Categories Turks & Caicos

Turks & Caicos: New Image Released

A new promotional image for Turks & Caicos has been released alongside this interview with David Hare, as when he appeared alongside actors Bill Nighy and Helena Bonhan Carter at a private screening of Turks & Caicos at London’s SoHo Hotel. Check the image in larger quality in our gallery, while you read the interview below:

“I can’t stand the body count in contemporary drama. The number of killings in modern films is ridiculous, with some featuring as many as 150 deaths.”

Hare said he was determined to avoid unrealistic violence. “It’s really important to these films that I can’t personally stand the body count in contemporary drama. I just think it’s ridiculous,” he said. “I’ve seen films in which 150 people have been killed and the next day the Mayor of New York says we’re very angry about this. At what level of reality is this meant to be happening?

“I’m watching The Bridge and I know The Bridge is wonderful, but 25 people have been killed in the first four episodes and there’s no politician, there’s no media, there’s a few detectives investigating it and I just don’t believe it.”

“What I wanted to do was restore tension, what Hitchcock used to do, he never killed anybody. He always said it’s a terrible mistake to kill anyone because then all the tension’s gone, whereas now 12 people are killed in the first minute. So it’s restoring suspense. Nobody is seen with a gun because in intelligence work not many people carry guns. It’s trying to be realistic and prove that you can be just as entertaining without guns as with.”

He added: “I don’t believe that MI5 knock people off. What they do is … make the lives of the people who blow the whistle against them unliveable.”

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